Windows File Recovery is a new tool that Microsoft released via the Store

Microsoft has released a new tool for Windows 10 users. Named Windows File Recovery, it is available in the Microsoft Store. It is a console app, which, as it follows from its name, can be used to restore accidentally deleted, or corrupted files.

Windows File Recovery

Microsoft has announced the app as follows:

If you can’t locate a lost file from your backup, then you can use Windows File Recovery, which is a command line app available from the Microsoft Store. Use this app to try to recover lost files that have been deleted from your local storage device (including internal drives, external drives, and USB devices) and can’t be restored from the Recycle Bin. Recovery on cloud storage and network file shares is not supported.

The app requires Windows 10 build 19041 or later.

Key features of Windows File Recovery

  • Target file names, keywords, file paths, or extensions in your recovery
  • Recovers JPEG, PDF, PNG, MPEG, Office files, MP3 & MP4, ZIP files and more
  • Recover from HDD, SSD, USB, and memory cards
  • Supports NTFS, FAT, exFAT and ReFS file systems

There are three modes you can use to recover files: Default, Segment, and Signature. Each mode works best under certain conditions. Here's a brief explanation for them.

File SystemCircumstancesRecommended mode
NTFSDeleted recentlyDefault
Deleted a while agoFirst try Segment, then Signature
After formatting a disk
A corrupted disk
FAT, exFAT, ReFSRecovery file type is supportedSignature

The Windows File Recovery tool is available for free on the Microsoft Store.

Download and install the app

After installing, open a new command prompt, and type winfr /?. Also, check out this official guide.

Source: WalkingCat

3 thoughts on “Windows File Recovery is a new tool that Microsoft released via the Store

  1. Zelanium

    It’s interesting that MS is now offering suhohl on their own. Thank you for making me aware of it. However, Microsoft’s obsession with the Store is a bit regrettable. I understand why it’s useful to distribute and update software, but a console applet…?

    Reply
  2. Shyam Reddy

    Interesting! GUI would have been better. Thank Sergey!

    Reply
  3. Bob

    I wonder what usefulness or role this has in the era of SSDs. It is not easy to recover data from SSDs and Microsoft tools except Sysinternals are often mediocre or below average at best.

    Reply

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