Microsoft May Kill File History in Windows 10 Fall Creators Update

Windows 10 comes with a built-in backup system called "File History". It allows the user to create a backup copy of files stored on your PC. There are a number of use cases for this feature. For example, it can help you to transfer your files from an old PC to a new one. Or you can use it to backup your files to an external removable drive. It looks like Microsoft is going to remove File History in the upcoming Windows 10 Fall Creators Update.


Windows 10 Fall Creators Update, also known by its code name "Redstone 3", is the next major update to Windows 10. It is in active development as of this writing. Participants of the Windows Insider program regularly receive preview versions of Windows 10 from the Redstone 3 branch.

Windows 10 File History

However, a few days ago Microsoft accidentally released an internal build to Insiders. Users who were able to get Windows 10 build 16212 found new string resources in system DLL files. Microsoft enthusiast WalkingCat spotted the following line:

"Making new backups with File History is no longer supported."

Microsoft might be working on a cloud-based File History replacement which we might see in the future. There is also a possibility that they decided to remove the feature completely based on their telemetry feedback. Anyway, the details are not known yet but features are removed by Microsoft citing low use, no matter how great or useful they are.

Source: MSPowerUser.

4 thoughts on “Microsoft May Kill File History in Windows 10 Fall Creators Update

  1. Aiden Quinn

    Removing Windows’ backup feature seems like a pretty stupid move from Microsoft as it provides an easy, built-in option for making backups to external drives.

    Reply
  2. David H Johnson

    While backing up files to another drive is fine, what if that drive fails or, God forbid, your house burns down with your computer in it? This is the reason I always back up my most important files to the Cloud. They will always be there safe, and sound.

    Reply
    1. MDJ

      And whilst in the cloud you’ll always face the possibility of someone with right privilleigies browsing through what they shall not, Of course, there’s also a hack issue as it’s no problem that most of people don’t go with more then a dozen characters in their passwords.

      Reply

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